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NFL AM: Chip Kelly Not Done Making Waves

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More Moves for Eagles

Chip Kelly was a media sensation during the offseason, mainly because he gave reporters something to write about during the slow points in the NFL calendar. His sensationalistic services are no longer needed now that training camps are underway, but that doesn’t mean he’s done making waves.

Kelly continued his sweeping overhaul of Philadelphia’s roster on Saturday, trading CB Brandon Boykin to the Steelers in exchange for a conditional fifth-round draft pick in 2016. The selection becomes a fourth-rounder if Boykins plays in 60 percent of more of Pittsburgh’s defensive snaps.

Boykin was Philadelphia’s starting slot cornerback last season. Despite intercepting just one pass (after picking off six passes in 2013), Boykin was rated the league’s No. 21 cornerback according to Pro Football Focus.

The Eagles were willing to deal Boykin because he is entering the final year of his contract and was unikely to re-sign in Philadelphia, as he’s made it know he desires a larger role. He’ll get that opportunity with the Steelers, who have nothing but opportunity in their secondary following the offseason retirements of Ike Taylor and Troy Polamalu.

“It speaks more to our depth at the position,” Kelly said. “We thought it was the move to make.”

The Boykin trade wasn’t the only headline news out of Eagles camp this weekend. There was also an update on the Philadelphia’s biggest trade of the offseason, the acquisition of Sam Bradford.

Bradford, coming off a second ACL tear, was cleared for full participation in training camp. He took every snap with the first team offense on Sunday and looked sharp in doing so.

“We don’t have any restrictions on him,” Kelly said.

Kromer Suspended Six Games

Aaron Kromer avoid prosecution after being arrested for allegedly punching a teenage boy in the face for using his beach chairs, but he was unable to avoid punishment altogether. The Bills suspended Kromer for six games on Sunday after an internal investigation of the incident.

The charges against Kromer were dropped at the request of the minor’s parents, who are ready to move on from the ordeal.

As for Kromer, he won’t be moving on until mid-October.

“Over the past several weeks the Bills organization has gathered information regarding the incident,” Bills president Russ Brandon said. “We worked in conjunction with the NFL on this matter and we are highly supportive of the NFL Personal Conduct Policy that holds all NFL and club employees to a higher standard. … We look forward to coach Kromer rejoining the Bills organization at training camp.”

Kromer is the same coach who anonymously critcized QB Jay Cutler to ESPN last season in Chicago. It caused several veterans in the Bears locker room to turn on him and forced Kromer to issue a tearful apology.

Unfortunately, the same rule that applies to offensive linemen applish to offensive line coaches: the less you hear about them, the better they’re doing.

Wagner Signs $43 Million Extension

Last week, Seahawks LB Bobby Wagner conceded that Seattle “can’t sign everybody.” On Sunday, GM John Schneider proved he isn’t done signing people just yet.

The Seahawks announced on Sunday they have agreed to terms on a new four-year contract with Wagner. NFL Media Insider Ian Rapoport reports the deal is worth $43 million and includes $22 million in guaranteed money.

Wagner was entering the final season of his rookie contract. He has dominanted since entering the league as a second-round pick out of Utah, racking up 364 tackles, nine sacks and five interceptions during that time.

He missed five games due to injury last season, but his return in Week 12 sparked Seattle’s run to consecutive division and conference championships.

The Seahawks have now extended their signal callers on offense and defense within a 36-hour span. With that foundation in place, Seattle’s run as a contender figures to extend well into the future.

Dez’s Non-Story

There are some non-stories that we in the media feel compelled to write about. For example, when a draft prospect meets with a team during Senior Bowl week. Or when an aging veteran talks about being in the best shape he’s been in over the last five years.

The latest example of such a non-story? Dez Bryant’s training camp scuffle with teammate Tyler Patmon. Although both players are Oklahoma State products, that didn’t stop them from coming to blows on Sunday. The hot-headed Bryant even pursued Patmon after the fight appeared to be over, drawing boos from Cowboys fans in attendance.

“It’s two great competitors going at it. We were chirping a little bit back and forth. I got a little bit overheated. … I was giving him a little bit of mouth, talking about a whole bunch of stuff to him. He was talking back to me, and it just escalated to the next play. … He wasn’t going to back down, I wasn’t going to back down. … At the end of the day, we shook hands, we hugged and we respect one another.”

This was not simply Bryant trying to talk his way out of hot water. Patmon was also quick to dismiss the scuffle as much a do about nothing.

“We’re family. It’s intense out here, it’s training camp. It’s part of it. … We love each other.”

Training camp fights are an everyday occurrence this time of year. They happen in every city on a weekly basis. And while Bryant will obviously catch the headline heat because of his reputation, it is often the young guy looking to make a name for himself who is the instigator in situations like this.

Either way, this story is over now … not that a training camp fight was ever a story to begin with.

Want to talk more about these and other headlines? Join Michael Lombardo for his weekly NFL Chat on Friday at 2pm EST. But you don’t have to wait until then … you can ask your question now!


About Michael Lombardo

Michael Lombardo

Michael Lombardo has spent more than 10 years as a team expert at Scout.com, primarily covering the Chargers, Cardinals and Panthers. He has been published by the NFL Network, Fox Sports and other venues.