NFL

Best And Worst Draft Pick In Each Team’s History: AFC East

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Buffalo Bills

Best: Andre Reed, WR

Andre Reed was one of the best wide receivers in his era and the Buffalo Bills were able to snag him in the fourth round. He was one of the catalysts of the Bills’ journey to four straight Super Bowls and the best weapon on one of the best offenses of all time, which led to his induction into the hall of fame in 2014. That certainly qualifies for a place on this list.

Worst: Aaron Maybin, DE

Aaron Maybin was supposed to be Von Miller before Miller ever entered the NFL. Maybin was thought to be a speed rusher with flexible hips who would haunt quarterbacks for years to come. Unfortunately, Maybin was never able to figure out the best way to use his physical gifts, which is why he never found a home in the NFL.

Miami Dolphins

Best: Dan Marino, QB

Dan Marino may be the best pure passer in NFL history. He never got the Dolphins to a Super Bowl, but Marino was one of the best players of his time. Marino was ahead of his time, and the Hall of Famer is the best pick in the history of the Miami Dolphins.

Worst: Ted Ginn Jr., WR

He may have found a niche with the Carolina Panthers now, but Ted Ginn Jr. was a huge bust for the Miami Dolphins. He was supposed to be the vertical threat that would take the Dolphins offense to the next level, but his lack of technique and ability to separate didn’t allow him to produce at a high level. Ginn was a classic gadget player who struggled when he had to be relied on consistently.

New England Patriots

Best: Tom Brady, QB

Well, this was easy. The most infamous pick in NFL history, Tom Brady was the 199th-overall pick, but he turned into the best quarterback in NFL history and a future Hall of Famer. He is a four-time Super Bowl champion and the main reason why the Patriots have put together 13 double-digit winning seasons in a row. Brady may not only be the best pick in the Patriots’ history, but in NFL history.

Worst: Ken Sims, DL

Another player who was ravaged by injuries, Ken Sims only played for more than nine games in a season four times. Known for his poor practice habits, Sims was never able to turn in on during games as he only had 17 sacks in his career.

New York Jets

Best: Darrelle Revis, CB

In a league where the shutdown cornerback was thought to be extinct, Darrelle Revis proved that was false. Revis shut down any receiver that ventured to “Revis Island” and the New York Jets prospered because of it. Revis is the closest thing we’ve seen to Deion Sanders in this era, which is why he is hands down a future Hall of Famer.

Worst: Vernon Gholston, DE

A player who sky rocketed up boards because of his size and athleticism, Gholston never had the technique to make it in the NFL. Gholston became the laughing stock of the NFL and of the biggest busts in recent memory.


About John Owning

John Owning

John Owning is a NFL columnist for Football Insiders. He has years of experience covering the NFL, NFL draft and NCAA football. John's work has been featured on the Bleacher Report and DraftBreakdown.com